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BloodSpell Development Updates

2nd Down and 1 to go

BloodSpell Development Updates

2nd Down and 1 to go

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As far as sound goes, Episodes 1 and 2 of Act 1 are in the can. Well, okay... they are perched on the edge of the can; if you sneeze, they'd fall in. Hugh and his hand-picked panel of Uberviewers are going to give them a look-see(hear), I tweak as needed, and they're ready to go.

Episode 3 hasn't had a great deal done to it since the very rough festival draft awhile back, so I've still got a few long nights ahead of me, but it's exciting to have two of the three in this super-blitz-pack completed, and I'm in a good rhythm now that I've figured out how to keep Cubase stable. If any of you are Cubasing, some things to keep in mind when working on large projects:

  1. Turn off video thumbnails. They are helpful for orienting you on the timeline, but make good use of Markers instead.

  2. Increase the video cache size. Default is only 3MB. Increasing it helps the preview video sync up quicker when jumping around.

  3. SAVE OFTEN. And close / restart the program every couple hours during recording, and every 30 minutes or so during mixing. This clears the Undo Buffers (it's the only way to do so; Steinberg, FIX THIS!!!). If those undo buffers get too big, the program gives you a warning telling you to save under a new filename... and then when you try to save, it doesn't let you. Don't let it get to the warning... because the warning is not a warning, any more than the Grim Reaper at your door is a "warning" about living right. And let me just say, when you are doing mix automation on a large multi-track recording, those buffers fill up FAST. Beware.


To marry the final audio with the video, I'm making use of VirtualDub for the first time. Certainly I'd heard of it before, but hadn't had the occasion to use it yet. It's got a very nifty feature where you can replace the audio in a video file without affecting the video render at all, which has been a huge timesaver. Simply set Video to Direct Stream Copy and Audio to WAV Soundtrack, select your audio file, and then Save As AVI. It delivers at something like 4500 frames per second. Zoom!

That's it for now. Gonna rest a few hours and get back to it!
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